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June 2019

For the Friends and Patients of:

Anthony Fava, D.C.
508 Hamburg Tpk #203
Wayne, NJ 07470
(973) 389-8145
www.DrAnthonyFavaBlog.com

Member of www.Chiro-Trust.org

 

 

“Truth builds trust.”
~ Marilyn Suttle

 
whiplash

Whiplash:

Multi-Modal Care for Whiplash Patients

The term whiplash associated disorders (WAD) describes a constellation of symptoms that includes (partial list) pain, stiffness/limited motion, dizziness, headache, depression/anxiety, and brain-fog. The condition is associated with accelerations/deceleration events like car accidents, sports collisions, or slip and falls. Such injuries are classified into four categories: WAD I (no/minimal complaints/injury), WAD II (soft-tissue injury – muscle/tendon and/or ligament injury), WAD III (nerve injury), WAD IV (fracture). More than 85% of those involved in a motor vehicle collision (MVC) experience neck pain, with 29-40% recovering within a little more than three months and about 23% still not having recovered after one year.

A 2016 systematic review generated treatment guidelines for patients with WAD and/or neck associated disorders (NAD) in the context of both a recent injury and for cases in which pain has persisted for longer than three months. Importantly, these guidelines were formed with input from several types of healthcare providers, including doctors of chiropractic, medical doctors, and physical therapists.

For recent-onset neck pain (0-3 months), the authors recommend multimodal care (multiple types); manipulation or mobilization; range-of-motion home exercise or multimodal manual therapy (for grades I-II NAD); adding supervised graded strengthening exercise (grade III NAD); and multimodal care (grade III WAD).

For persistent neck pain (more than 3 months), the review recommends multimodal care or stress self-management; manipulation with soft tissue therapy; high-dose massage; supervised group exercise; supervised yoga; supervised strengthening exercises or home exercises (grades I-II NAD); multimodal care or practitioner's advice (grades I-III NAD); and supervised exercise with advice or advice alone (grades I-II WAD). For patients with persistent neck and shoulder pain, evidence supports mixed supervised and unsupervised high-intensity strength training or advice alone (grades I-III NAD).

The term, “multi-modal care” is defined as a grouping of manipulation, mobilization, and soft tissue techniques (myofascial release, contract-hold, trigger point therapy, muscle energy, and more).  Multi-modal care may also incorporate the use of hot or cold packs, assisted stretching, advice to stay active or modify activity, and neck/shoulder exercise training. Doctors of chiropractic often take a multi-modal approach when treating patients with musculoskeletal pain, including those with whiplash associated disorders.

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Anthony Fava, D.C.
508 Hamburg Tpk #203
Wayne, NJ 07470
(973) 389-8145
www.DrAnthonyFavaBlog.com